Reintroduced Przewalski’s horses have a different diet

Researchers have now found through tail hair analysis that before their extinction in the wild Przewalski’s horses had been on a different diet than today. Thanks to improved societal attitude, the horses have now access to richer pastures. In former times, the wild horses were hunted and chased away.    ….More Continue reading

Pioneer of PZP in Wild Horses Dies at 75

PZP has been used in fertility control programs in the United States since 1989.  Through the years, advances in PZP and other fertility control vaccines have improved delivery and efficacy making them a more viable alternative to lethal control methods. Jay Kirkpatrick was arguably the most influential person in the development of this humane method of controlling over abundant species. For the full article… Pioneer of PZP birth control in wild horses dies at 75 Continue reading

The Secret Lives of Horses (from Scientific American)

  Scientists have long studied the best ways to train and treat domesticated horses, but they largely ignored the behavior of free-ranging horses. Recent research has begun to fill that gap.  Observations from long-term studies of wild horses show that the conventional, male-centric view of their power dynamics is wrong.  In fact, females often call the shots, employing tactics such as cooperation and persistence to get their way.  more…   Continue reading

Genes link wild horses in Western Canada to Siberian Breed

A genetic study of a remote population of wild horses in Western Canada has posed a raft of new questions about their origins, with the results revealing an intriguing link to the Yakut horses of Siberia. It is assumed that the horses observed by European fur traders in the early 1800s in association with Tsilhqot’in First Nations in the Chilcotin area of south central British Columbia were descended from Spanish-derived horses brought in about 1740 along native trade routes from plateau grasslands in what is now Washington State. Today, an estimated 1,000 feral horses still survive in remote areas of… Continue reading

Research reveals domestication’s effects on horse genes

A study, carried out by scientists at the University of Copenhagen’s Center for GeoGenetics, detailed some 125 genes related to physical and behavioral traits favored by humans. By comparing the genomes of modern domesticated horse varieties to DNA sampled from now-extinct wild horse species, researchers were able to isolate genes that control skeletal muscles, balance, coordination, cardiac strength, fear response, and more. Read more: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2014/12/16/Research-reveals-domestications-effects-on-horse-genes/4501418747928/#ixzz3MOKCWUBB   Continue reading